Use bass distortion pedal like a pro

Susan Fernandez June 06 2022

A bass distortion pedal is a great way to add some extra grit and attitude to your bass playing. But with so many different pedals on the market, it can be tough to know which one is right for you. Here's a quick guide to help you choose the perfect bass distortion pedal for your needs.

Does bass need distortion?

The right amount of drive on a bass guitar may make any rhythm seem a bit more distinct and unique, no matter the style. It aids in the evenness of your bass sound - A distortion is a type of compressing.

It evens out the sound by evening out the volume peaks and valleys that naturally occur when you play. This gives your bass playing a smoother, more consistent sound. Bass distortion can also help fatten up your tone and make it sound bigger and fuller. If you're looking for a more low-end growl, or just want to add some extra attitude to your playing, a distortion pedal is a great way to do it.

Types of bass distortion pedals

There are a few different types of bass distortion pedals on the market, each with its own unique benefits.

  1. Tube-driven pedals are known for their warm, vintage sound. They tend to add a bit of color to your tone and can make your bass sound a bit more like an overdriven tube amp.
  2. Solid-state pedals are known for their more modern, aggressive sound. They're often used by metal and punk bassists who want a heavier sound.
  3. Hybrid pedals combine the best of both worlds, offering a warm, vintage tube sound with the added aggression of a solid-state pedal.

What is the best distortion pedal for bass?

Here is the list of the best distortion pedals that are available on the market today.

  • Darkglass Microtubes B7K Ultra V2:

This bass distortion pedal from Darkglass is one of the best on the market, offering a wide range of tones and a powerful output. The sound is clear and articulate, with plenty of low ends. Control-wise, it's very versatile, allowing you to dial in the perfect sound for your needs. As a bass guitarist, you may consider this the best distortion pedal for low-end growl and tones.

  • Source Audio Aftershock:

With the best value for money, this distortion pedal from Source Audio is ideal for those on a budget. It's a great all-around pedal that offers a wide range of tones, from light overdrive to full-on distortion. The sound is clear and articulate, making it perfect for both live and studio settings. Source Audio Aftershock is one of the best distortion pedals for those who want a versatile pedal that won't break the bank.

  • Behringer Bass Overdrive BOD400:

One of the cheapest distortion pedals on the market, this Behringer pedal is perfect for those on a tight budget. It offers a decent range of tones, from light overdrive to full-on distortion. The sound is clear and articulate, making it suitable for both live and studio settings. However, it doesn't have as much low-end growl as some of the other pedals on this list. BOD400 is considered to be one of the best distortion pedals for its price range.

  • MXR M85 Bass Distortion:

MXR is known for making high-quality pedals, and their bass distortion pedal is no exception. It offers a wide range of tones, from light overdrive to full-on distortion. The sound is clear and articulate, making it perfect for both live and studio settings. The MXR M85 is one of the best distortion pedals for those who want a versatile and high-quality pedal.

  • Aguilar AGRO Bass Overdrive:

Another bass distortion pedal that offers a wide range of tones, from light overdrive to full-on distortion. The sound is clear and articulate, making it perfect for both live and studio settings. Aguilar's AGRO pedal is one of the best distortion pedals for those who want a versatile pedal with a great sound.

  • Electro-Harmonix XO Bass Blogger Distortion:

You could say that this pedal was designed with the bass player in mind. It offers a wide range of tones, from light overdrive to full-on distortion. The sound is clear and articulate, making it perfect for both live and studio settings. The XO Bass Blogger is one of the best distortion pedals for those who want a versatile and high-quality pedal.

  • Ampeg Scrambler Bass Overdrive:

Ampeg is known among bass players for its high-quality amplifiers, and their Scrambler bass overdrive pedal is no exception. Ampeg would be a perfect choice if you're looking for a pedal that offers a wide range of tones, from light overdrive to full-on distortion. The sound is clear and articulate, making it perfect for both live and studio settings.

These are only 7 bass distortion pedals out of many available on the market today. As a bass player, you may find that one of these pedals is the perfect choice for your needs. If you're looking for a versatile and high-quality pedal, MXR's M85 or Aguilar's AGRO would be great choices. If you're on a budget, Behringer's BOD400 or Source Audio's Aftershock would be great options. Whatever your needs, there's a bass distortion pedal out there that's perfect for you.

What does a bass distortion do?

Fuzz bass, also known as "bass overdrive" or "bass distortion," is a way of playing the electric bass or modifying its signal that achieves a buzzy, distorted, and overdriven sound in onomatopoeic terms. This style of bass playing was popularized in the 1960s and 1970s by such artists as James Jamerson, Bootsy Collins, Stanley Clarke, and Carol Kaye. It is important to note that while these players all used fuzz bass to create their unique sounds, they each approached the technique in different ways.

There are several ways to achieve a fuzz bass sound, but the most common is by using a fuzz pedal. Fuzz pedals are designed to add distortion and overdrive to your signal, giving it a buzzy, distorted sound. There are many different types of fuzz pedals available on the market today, so it's important to choose one that will fit your needs.

Another way to create a fuzz bass sound is by using an overdrive pedal. Overdrive pedals are designed to add distortion and overdrive to your signal, giving it a buzzy, distorted sound. There are many different types of overdrive pedals available on the market today, so it's important to choose one that will fit your needs.

Yet another way to create a fuzz bass sound is by using a distortion pedal. Distortion pedals are designed to add distortion and overdrive to your signal, giving it a buzzy, distorted sound. There are many different types of distortion pedals available on the market today, so it's important to choose one that will fit your needs.

No matter which method you use to achieve a fuzz bass sound, it's important to experiment and find what works best for you. There is no right or wrong way to create a fuzz bass sound, so feel free to experiment and find what works best for you.

How do you use a bass distortion pedal?

Now when you chose the perfect option for your guitar, you need to know how to use it.

There are a few things to consider when using a bass distortion pedal. The first is where to place the pedal in your signal chain. Most bass players will place their distortion pedal after their overdrive or boost pedal but before their EQ and compressor pedals. This allows the distortion pedal to add its own unique character to your sound without affecting the other pedals in your signal chain.

The second thing to consider is how much distortion you want to add to your sound. This is a matter of personal preference, but it's important to experiment with different settings to find what sounds best for you. Start with the distortion level set low and gradually increase it until you find the sound you're looking for.

The third thing to consider is how to achieve the best sound possible. This is a matter of personal preference, but there are a few things you can do to get the most out of your pedal. First, make sure your guitar is in good condition and set up properly. Second, use fresh batteries or an external power supply. Third, use high-quality cables and connectors. Fourth, experiment with different settings and find what sounds best for you.

These are just a few things to consider when using a bass distortion pedal. Experiment with different settings and find what works best for you. There is no right or wrong way to use a bass distortion pedal, so feel free to experiment and find what works best for you.

What songs use distortion on bass?

There are many famous songs that use distortion on the bass. Some of these songs include "Superstition" by Stevie Wonder, "Come Together" by The Beatles, "Aqualung" by Jethro Tull, and "Walk This Way" by Aerosmith. There are also many modern songs that use distortion on bass, such as "Get Lucky" by Daft Punk and "All Apologies" by Nirvana.

If you're looking for songs that use distortion on bass, try searching for a song in your favorite genre that uses distortion on the guitar. Many of these songs will also use distortion on the bass. You can also try searching for a specific artist that you know uses distortion on their bass playing. No matter what genre of music you're into, there are likely many songs that use distortion on the bass. So go out and start listening for them! You might be surprised at how many you find.

What genres of music need bass distortion pedals?

If you are writing music in the genres of rock, metal, punk, or hardcore, then you will need a bass distortion pedal. These genres of music use distortion on the guitar and bass to create a heavier, more aggressive sound. Without distortion, these genres of music would sound very different.

If you are a jazz or blues bass player, you may not need a distortion pedal. These genres of music typically don't use distortion on the bass. But if you want to add some distortion to your sound, there's nothing wrong with using a pedal. You may just find that it doesn't fit well with the rest of your band's sound. Experiment with different pedals and see what works best for you. There is no right or wrong way to use a bass distortion pedal. It's all about finding the sound you're looking for.

What order should my bass pedals be in?

According to conventional wisdom, the ideal pedal order is wah/filter, compression, overdrive, modulation and pitch effects, delay, and reverb. However, this is just a general guideline. The best way to figure out the ideal pedal order for your setup is to experiment and find what sounds best for you.

Some bass players like to place their distortion pedal first in the signal chain. This allows the distortion pedal to add its own unique character to your sound without affecting the other pedals in your signal chain. Others like to place their distortion pedal after their overdrive or boost pedal but before their EQ and compressor pedals. This allows the distortion to be added after the overdrive or boost, which can add more clarity and definition to your sound.

The third thing to consider is how much distortion you want to add to your sound. This is a matter of personal preference, but it's something to keep in mind when choosing the pedal order for your distortion pedal. If you're not sure what order to put your pedals in, try different orders and see what sounds best to you. There is no right or wrong answer, so feel free to experiment. You may find that one order works better for certain songs or styles of playing than another.

The bottom line is that there is no one perfect pedal order for all bass players. It's all about finding what works best for you and your setup. Experiment with different orders and see what sounds best to you.