How to tune to Drop D? (several steps guide)

Svetlana May 05 2022

Drop D is a common guitar tuning where the low E string is tuned down to a D note. This can be done by simply detuning the string until it matches the pitch of a D note played on another string.

There are a few reasons why you might want to tune to Drop D. For one, it can make some power chords easier to play since you don't have to hold down as many strings. Additionally, it can give your guitar a deeper, darker sound since the low E string will be lower in pitch than usual.

How does drop D tuning work? Well, E-A-D-G-B-E is the name of the tuning sequence. The lowest sounding to highest sounding string in this type of tuning is EADGBE, from bottom to top. To go from Drop D to Drop D, you must lower your lowest (E(The 6th string)) string by one step to D. That's it. Then the notes will be D-A-D-G-B-E, which is why it's called "Drop D."

How do I tune my guitar to drop D?

The Drop D tuning is almost the same as standard guitar tuning, with one exception: the 6th (lowest) string is tuned down a whole step, resulting in a "DADGBE" pattern. Lowering the sixth string in drop D tuning provides you with several benefits, including access to a lower pitch range and the ability to form some powerful chords.

To tune your guitar to drop D, follow these steps:

  1. Play the fourth string (D) on your guitar and compare it to the sixth string (low E). The notes should match. If they don't, use your tuning peg to adjust the pitch of the sixth string until it matches the fourth.
  2. Play the fifth string (A) and compare it to the fourth string (D). Again, the notes should match. If they don't, use your tuning peg to adjust the pitch of the fifth string until it matches the fourth.
  3. Play the sixth string (low E) and compare it to the fifth string (A). Once more, the notes should match. If they don't, use your tuning peg to adjust the pitch of the sixth string until it matches the fifth.
  4. Congratulations! Your guitar is now tuned to drop D.

There are a few things to keep in mind when you're playing in drop D tuning. First, since the low E string is now a whole step lower than usual, it will be easier to accidentally bend it out of tune. Be careful not to over-bend the string when you're playing power chords or doing any other type of bending. Second, you'll need to use a heavier gauge of strings when you're playing in drop D tuning. This is because the lower tension on the strings can cause them to buzz or sound muted if they're too light.

How do you tune A drop D Capo?

To tune a drop D capo, you need to lower the 6th string (low E) down to a D. This can be done by simply detuning the string until it matches the pitch of a D note played on another string. Once you have the 6th string tuned to a D, the notes will be D-A-D-G-B-E, which is why it's called "Drop D."

You may also want to use a heavier gauge of strings when you're playing in drop D tuning. This is because the lower tension on the strings can cause them to buzz or sound muted if they're too light. If you place a capo on the 4th fret in Drop D, the notes will be E-A-D-G-B-E. This is the same as standard guitar tuning, except the 6th string (low E) is tuned down to a D.

Is Drop D tuning easier?

Drop D tuning is one of the simplest alternate tunings to pick up. It just modifies the pitch of one string, lowering the tone of your low E string by a whole step and turning it into a D. Alternate tunings haven't been around that long. They started popping up in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as composers began to experiment with new sounds.

One of the first popular alternate tunings was called "open G." This tuning was used by blues musicians such as Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters. Open G tuning is achieved by detuning your low E string down to a D, leaving the rest of the strings in standard tuning. This gives you a D-G-D-G-B-D pattern.

What strings are best for drop tuning?

If you're playing in drop D tuning, you'll need to use a heavier gauge of strings. This is because the lower tension on the strings can cause them to buzz or sound muted if they're too light. A good rule of thumb is to use the heaviest gauge of strings that you're comfortable with.

D'Addario EXL117 is a good choice for electric guitarists who are looking for a set of strings that will stay in tune and provide a clear, bright tone. For acoustic guitarists, the D'Addario EJ16 Phosphor Bronze Light Acoustic Guitar Strings are a great option. These strings have a warm, rich tone and they're designed to resist corrosion.

DR Strings DDT-11 is another good choice for electric guitarists. These strings are specifically designed for drop tuning, and they're made from a high-carbon steel alloy that provides a clear, bright tone.

You can consider Ernie Ball Mammoth Slinky if you want the best drop D tuning strings. They're made from a high-carbon steel alloy that provides a clear, bright tone and they're designed to stay in tune even when you're playing hard and fast. Moreover, Ernie Ball Mammoth Slinky strings are also relatively easy on the fingers, making them a good choice for beginners.

One more option is GHS GBZW Guitar Boomers, which are specifically designed for drop tuning. They're made from a high-carbon steel alloy that provides a clear, bright tone and they're also relatively easy on the fingers.

Elixir Strings Nanoweb would be a perfect choice for those who are looking for the best drop D tuning strings. They're made from a high-carbon steel alloy that provides a clear, bright tone and they're also designed to resist corrosion.

Finally, Ernie Ball Not Even Slinky is the best choice for those who are looking for the heaviest gauge of strings. They're made from a high-carbon steel alloy that provides a clear, bright tone and they're also designed to stay in tune even when you're playing hard and fast.

Do you need different strings for drop D?

Normally, you can play in Drop D tuning with the same strings, but if you're a particularly strong player, the low D string may seem out of tune due to its lower tension than the other strings. In that case, you may want to use a heavier gauge of string for the low D. If you're using a guitar with a floating bridge (like a Floyd Rose), you'll need to use lighter strings so that the bridge can float freely.

Drop D tuning is a popular choice for guitarists who want to play heavier music. If you're looking for a heavier sound, you may want to use a drop D tuning. This tuning is achieved by simply detuning the 6th string (low E) down to a D. Once you have the 6th string tuned to a D, the notes will be D-A-D-G-B-E, which is why it's called "Drop D."

You may also want to use a heavier gauge of strings when you're playing in drop D tuning. This is because the lower tension on the strings can cause them to buzz or sound muted if they're too light. A good rule of thumb is to use the heaviest gauge of strings that you're comfortable with.

What string gauge is best for drop D?

As a musician, you may find that you like different string gauges for different tunings. A good rule of thumb is to use the heaviest gauge of strings that you're comfortable with. This will help to ensure that your strings don't buzz or sound muted when you're playing.

Guitar StringsTuningFender Scale (25.5″):

This tuning is achieved by simply detuning the 6th string (low E) down to a D. Once you have the 6th string tuned to a D, the notes will be D-A-D-G-B-E, which is why it's called "Drop D."

You may also want to use a heavier gauge of strings when you're playing in drop D tuning. This is because the lower tension on the strings can cause them to buzz or sound muted if they're too light. A good rule of thumb is to use the heaviest gauge of strings that you're comfortable with.

Gibson Scale (24 3/4″):

Another string gauge you might want to try is the Gibson Scale. This tuning is achieved by detuning the 6th string (low E) down to a D. Once you have the 6th string tuned to a D, the notes will be D-A-D-G-B-E. Gibson Scale is a bit lower in tension than Fender Scale, so you may want to use a heavier gauge of string.

Drop D10-52:

The final string gauge you might want to try is the Drop D10-52. This tuning is achieved by detuning the 6th string (low E) down to a D. Once you have the 6th string tuned to a D, the notes will be D-A-D-G-B-E. The 10-52 gauge is the heaviest gauge of strings that we offer, so you may want to use this gauge if you're looking for a heavier sound.

Eb Standard10-52:

Any musician will tell you that there are an endless number of ways to tune a guitar. But if you're looking for a tuning that's specifically designed for heavy metal, you may want to try Eb Standard. This tuning is achieved by detuning the 6th string (low E) down to an Eb. Once you have the 6th string tuned to an Eb, the notes will be Eb-Bb-Eb-Ab-C-F.

Can you play drop D songs in standard tuning?

You may also play it in a double drop D to preserve the 3 D notes, or in drop D to maintain the d root note. Any song in drop D can be played in standard tuning by simply playing the lowest d note one octave higher. Standard tuning is usually denoted EADGBE, while drop D tuning is typically notated as DADGBE.

Meanwhile, you can play Drop D songs on a 7-string guitar by tuning the lowest string down to a D as well, or you can use a 6-string guitar and place a capo on the 6th fret. All of them are easy ways to make the shift from standard tuning to drop D. Some of the most popular songs with drop D tuning include "Black Hole Sun" by Soundgarden, "Today" by Smashing Pumpkins, and "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" by Bob Dylan.

To begin with, playing the drop D songs you should make different exercises like -

  • Play a D chord, then play the same D chord with your pinky on the 6th string 10th fret (this is a partial Dsus4).
  • Next, add your middle finger to the 9th fret 5th string. Now you have a Dsus2 shape.
  • To make a standard D shape simply omit your middle finger.
  • Mute the low E string with the side of your first finger when playing any of these chords to avoid an undesirable note clash.

Now that you know how to tune to drop D, you can experiment with some of the different ways to play this tuning. Be sure to try out different string gauges and see what works best for you. With a little practice, you'll be playing drop D songs like a pro in no time!

Bottom line

There are many different ways to tune a guitar, but Drop D is a popular choice for heavy metal music. To tune to Drop D, simply detune the 6th string (low E) down to a D. You may also want to use a heavier gauge of strings when you're playing in drop D tuning. This is because the lower tension on the strings can cause them to buzz or sound muted if they're too light.